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Mummy’s Royal Indomie And Other Cheap Things! 

It’s my mother’s birthday today. Continue reading “Mummy’s Royal Indomie And Other Cheap Things! “

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POINT B

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Sarah Kay

If I should have a daughter, instead of “Mom,”she’s going to call me “Point B,” because that way she knows that no matter what happens,at least she can always find her way to me. 

And I’m going to paint solar systems on the backs of her hands so she has to learn the entire universe before she can say, “Oh, I know that like the back of my hand.” 

And she’s going to learn that this life will hit you hard in the face,wait for you to get back up just so it can kick you in the stomach. But getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.

There is hurt, here, that cannot be fixed by Band-Aids or poetry. So the first time she realizes that Wonder Woman isn’t coming, I’ll make sure she knows she doesn’t have to wear the cape all by herself, because no matter how wide you stretch your fingers, your hands will always be too small to catch all the pain you want to heal. Believe me, I’ve tried.

 “And, baby,” I’ll tell her, don’t keep your nose up in the air like that. I know that trick; I’ve done it a million times. You’re just smelling for smoke so you can follow the trail back to a burning house, so you can find the boy who lost everything in the fire to see if you can save him.Or else find the boy who lit the fire in the first place, to see if you can change him. 

But I know she will anyway, so instead I’ll always keep an extra supply of chocolate and rain boots nearby, because there is no heartbreak that chocolate can’t fix. Okay, there’s a few that chocolate can’t fix. But that’s what the rain boots are for, because rain will wash away everything, if you let it.

I want her to look at the world through the underside of a glass-bottom boat, to look through a microscope at the galaxies that exist on the pinpoint of a human mind, because that’s the way my mom taught me. That there’ll be days like this. (Singing) There’ll be days like this, my momma said. When you open your hands to catch and wind up with only blisters and bruises; when you step out of the phone booth and try to fly and the very people you want to save are the ones standing on your cape; when your boots will fill with rain, and you’ll be up to your knees in disappointment. And those are the very days you have all the more reason to say thank you. Because there’s nothing more beautiful than the way the ocean refuses to stop kissing the shoreline, no matter how many times it’s sent away. 

You will put the wind in win some, lose some. You will put the star in starting over, and over. And no matter how many land mines erupt in a minute, be sure your mind lands on the beauty of this funny place called life. And yes, on a scale from one to over-trusting, I am pretty damn naive. But I want her to know that this world is made out of sugar. It can crumble so easily, but don’t be afraid to stick your tongue out and taste it. 

“Baby,” I’ll tell her, “remember, your momma is a worrier, and your poppa is a warrior, and you are the girl with small hands and big eyes who never stops asking for more.” Remember that good things come in threes and so do bad things. 

Always apologize when you’ve done something wrong,but don’t you ever apologize for the way your eyes refuse to stop shining. Your voice is small, but don’t ever stop singing. And when they finally hand you heartache, when they slip war and hatred under your door and offer you handouts on street-corners of cynicism and defeat, you tell them that they really ought to meet your mother.

©Sarah Kay

My Mother. My Hero.

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To describe my mother would be to write about a hurricane in its perfect power. Or the climbing, falling colors of a rainbow. – American poet, Maya Angelou.

 

I love photography. I love capturing beautiful moments. And the above picture is just one of those beautiful moments.

You see, I came from a family of five girls and a boy, a closely knit one. However, we all dread my father – In a good way though. Silence reigns supreme whenever he is at home. We do not talk anyhow when Daddy is around. Your words should be well calculated and spoken with grace. We fear, respect and adore my father.

Unfortunately, we relegate Mum to the background. We take her for granted and we are of the opinion that she is there to do everything; and by everything, I mean every single thing; but we do not dread Mother. With Mum, you can say whatever the hell you want to say. You can tell Mum about the stupid teachers you have and the grammatical errors they make. I will not forget to mention the fact that Mum is a TEACHER in CHURCH and in the Government Secondary School just across the street.

Back to when this picture was taken, my siblings had just arrived home for mid-term break and had this science assignment called “Electrolysis”. I’m the first child and I told them strictly not to bother me with it.
(Please I have no interest in SCIENCE but I LOVE TECHNOLOGY).

They had so many assignments and had no idea on how to begin. Mum had already spent the past few hours in helping them mold the fine art assignment.

It was Friday, Electrolysis had to be submitted and Mummy had said she was tired; but her twin babies were so frustrated. They had tried everything possible, called on all friends for help yet the electrolysis wasn’t electrolyzing (Whatever that means).

Anyway, my Mum decided to give it a try and alas! The diffusion and reaction and all the science-ish started happening. It was just like magic. It was at that moment I knew my mum was a HERO and the above picture was taken.

Meanwhile, my Dad kept saying repeatedly “Hope you people have done your assignments o. Pack your things and get ready to go to school on Saturday”; with no idea of the feat his darling wife had achieved in the afternoon.

I remember this incident when I had a “boil”* in my right eye. It was so big and embarrassing. So I called my Dad who immediately sent money for me to get antibiotics that sold for #3000. In my head, I am like “If I hear say I buy medicine for 3k”. I was already looking forward to buying the pill that costs #150.00. When Dad called that evening I told him I had bought it [The lie was necessary].

THE next morning, Mama called and said “Chichi, I know you’ve not bought that drug. I know you! You know you can’t deceive me”. I was so shocked that I burst into laughter. My mum joined me in laughing and with no hesitation; I went to buy the medication.

Being a mother is not an easy task. In fact, most times I have these random thoughts in my head, “being a mum is scary, can I cope? Guess I will have just one child to make things easier”.
A mother always knows her child. This is the point where I quote Rudyard Kipling – “God could not be everywhere, and therefore he made mothers.”

I love my dad too. I could die for him. But Mum, this is for you.

 Ada gi. (That’s the Igbo word for FIRST DAUGHTER).

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